Giving a *name* to your root filesystem

January 27, 2014

First, OSTree v2014.1 is out! Nothing earthshaking, but I’m happy with some of the fixes and features there.

One thing that’s absolutely fundamental about OSTree is that it forces one to name complete filesystem trees. While the system does not mandate any convention (they’re just strings), you have seen some examples in previous posts, like gnome-continuous/buildmaster/x86_64-devel-debug and fedostree/20/x86_64/base/minimal. Here the “OS” name starts first, and after that, you can choose whatever format you want. Now, traditional dpkg/rpm packages are names for partial filesystem trees (plus some metadata and scripts that run as root). When they’re assembled via a package manager onto the root partition of your drive, that collection is not normally named – what you have is an anonymous, and very often unique, custom set of packages.

There are of course efforts in various package systems and GNU/Linux distributions to attempt higher level management of software beyond “set of packages”. In Debian, metapackages are common. In Fedora, there is comps.

I could talk for quite a while about the management differences between the metapackage vs comps approaches, particularly after YumGroupsAsObjects. But suffice to say that I think both suffer badly from being glued on top of the “set of packages” model. In many cases they end up making things more complex, not less. Here is a blog entry that describes how Debian’s metapackages clash badly with another tool which tries to remove “unused” packages. From my observations in the Fedora context, comps groups are mainly used for initial system installation (in Anaconda) and early set up perhaps you do yum install @virtualization after installing a workstation.

How OSTree is less flexible, but more rigorous

With OSTree, you can say something like “I’m running fedostree/20/x86_64/base/minimal”. This is a name for a filesystem that was replicated from the rpm-ostree build server – and it is immutable. OSTree itself comes with no application mechanism, or even the ability to layer trees. So this is a far stronger and more rigorous description of the contents of your (visible) root filesystem.

For example, with the current rpm-ostree, if I remove a package from products.json, then it drops out of the filesystem tree composed on the server side, and thus will also disappear when clients upgrade. It’s really quite simple. The problem of removing old, unused packages is a messy subject in package systems like dpkg/rpm – it’s painful at the distribution level with things like Obsoletes, and if you are a downstream consumer of the distribution, if you installed a package at some point on your servers that you want no longer installed, your best bet is to use something like Puppet to assert that packages are removed.

Now, you still may be thinking “OSTree sounds cool, but I want to be able to install things!”.

Downstream tree construction and naming custom trees

I mentioned in the previous post that I plan to implement a feature like yum-ostree install strace, which would assemble a new filesystem tree from packages (just like rpm-ostree does the server side), and set it up for the next boot. But an interesting question arises – how should I name this filesystem tree? We could represent “install” by appending the string “+strace” to our current tree; so we might end up with a tree named “fedostree/20/x86_64/base/minimal+strace”. Now obviously this doesn’t scale really far – and perhaps leads us back towards wanting e.g. a “tracing-and-debugging-tools” metapackage (or comps group); if you care to install strace, why not also perf? With Fedora’s comps, it’s actually quite nice that we have a reserved symbol “@” and a distinct namespace from the normal package set. So we could synthesize a name like “fedostree/20/x86_64/base/minimal+@tracing”.

What I’m going for here really is that I’d like to cut down on the combinatoric complexity of packages by emphasizing layering over arbitrary additions and removals. This doesn’t mean that we need to completely restrict the system to layering – one could clearly implement yum-ostree remove X (for naming, append e.g. “-X” to the tree name). The lowest OSTree level lets you put whatever filesystem trees you want in it. But for many cases where people want to do this kind of thing, we can turn it into configuration instead of system manipulation. For example, using systemctl mask firewalld.service over yum remove firewalld. If something is supported via system configuration, we should prefer doing that rather than creating new filesystem trees; it’s more efficient and safe to replicate a pre-built tree that’s been tested and known to work, then add configuration.

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4 Responses to “Giving a *name* to your root filesystem”

  1. goibhniu Says:

    If I understand correctly it’s like nix profiles, except without generations (e.g.for rollbacks)?


    • OSTree doesn’t do per-user configuration. It would however be pretty easy to implement the equivalent of “nix-env” on top of it.

      OSTree is not a package system – it never resolves a dependency. It’s just a tool to do atomic swaps between immutable filesystem trees. Some deployment models can use that directly. Other deployment models may involve using RPM or dpkg locally, using OSTree underneath. One could imagine swapping out the heart of NixOS’s store with OSTree – it requires a read-only /usr though, to avoid corrupting the hardlinks.

      I have a small blurb comparing OSTree and NixOS here: https://wiki.gnome.org/Projects/OSTree/NixOSComparison

      At a high level I was very much inspired by NixOS, but I think that having to rebuild the entire world for a libc security update makes the system very impractical.


  2. Will you create a cheatsheet for ostree and traditional package managers?

    Is it a part of Fedora.next plan?


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